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A long history of involvement in Web Design and Development, with humble beginnings at Geocities and Angelfire, have exploded into a career in which I focus on Web Standards, Web Accessibility Guidelines, and Usability through Human-Computer Interaction theory. I also participate in an ongoing search for the best methods for building, maintaining, and enhance Web sites.

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Monday, October 7, 2013

Book Review: Backbone.js Testing

Summary

Over the past few weeks, I have spent time reading Backbone.js Testing at the request of the author, Ryan Roemer. This goes through the motions of creating a Notes application (think of a very stripped down and rudimentary Evernote) from the ground up, demonstrating thoroughly the process of testing the implementation throughout.
The Good
Every aspect of this text is well planned and executed. From an overview of the Backbone.js architecture to the Notes application itself, I was very pleased with the content and arrangement. Some of the topics covered by the author include:
  • Backbone.js Application Development
  • Mocha Testing Framework
  • Chai Assertion Framework
  • Sinon.JS Test Double Library
  • Test Automation with Selenium and PhantomJS
Not So Good
There really was little or nothing that I can criticize about Backbone.js Testing. The language used was clear and simple, while conveying even the most complex of topics in a way that, I believe, any level of JavaScript programmer would be able to digest easily. There were a few points at which the content, being fairly dense in terms of code snippets to delve through, was somewhat lacking in luster. However, even those areas were well-concieved, with the relevent code highlighted and some areas snipped. The full content remains available for download in the accompanying code samples, and even includes extensive implementation and testing details not specifically covered in the book itself.
Overall Impressions
Far and away, Backbone.js Testing is, in itself, a solid backbone for JS testing in general, while containing specifics related only to the name from which it's title is derived. In addition, the book provides an overarching view of the subject matter without either treading on any given area within too lightly or delving too deep. Finally, there is more than sufficient information in the book, and more so in the code samples, to give anyone looking to develop a test architecture a firm foundation for their implementation.
Note: Packt Publishing has not compensated me monetarily for writing this review. However, I have received a copy of the text for my time, and to allow me to read the title in order to review it.

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posted by Jake Kronika, Owner, Gridline Design at

1 Comments:

Blogger Jhann Abrum said...

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January 03, 2014 3:21 AM  

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